June 30, 2010

What Bouncers At Nightclubs Teach Us About Teaching Social Networking Skill

Friendly Bouncer
A professor from the Kellogg School of Management wondered: what rules do the bouncers at exclusive night clubs use to filter some clientele into the club and leave others out in the cold?

Bouncers weighed each cue differently. Social network mattered most, gender followed. For example, a young woman in jeans stood a higher chance of entrance than a well-dressed man. And an elegantly dressed black man stood little chance of getting in unless he knew someone special.

From Kottke.org

It's another reason that we need to raise an expectation that social networks' ins and outs need taught rather than caught. All amateurs get their appearance wrong at some time - we all get refused entry to the club. But  some of us get refused less often than others since we learned, or were told, how to dress, behave and hang out to get the things we want in life.

Trust me. I used to work in showbiz.

Bouncer pic is from Lomokev

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

interesting way of looking at it

Hey I was a bouncer once, as in 1 time. It was the smiles on the women's faces that got them in. And then the eye talk, oooweee. The tall guys burly guys got in last!

The comments to this entry are closed.

About Ewan

Ewan McIntosh is the founder of NoTosh, the no-nonsense company that makes accessible the creative process required to innovate: to find meaningful problems and solve them.

Ewan wrote How To Come Up With Great Ideas and Actually Make Them Happen, a manual that does what is says for education leaders, innovators and people who want to be both.

What does Ewan do?

Module Masterclass

School leaders and innovators struggle to make the most of educators' and students' potential. My team at NoTosh cut the time and cost of making significant change in physical spaces, digital and curricular innovation programmes. We work long term to help make that change last, even as educators come and go.

Recent Posts

    Archives

    More...